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on the City Council's Coundllofs, without dis- «gcwl« two w^ ago, it cossioo, again unanimously ^"^ P«l ^ ^^^f' voted to back tine kw during quest diing to fall back on, it can do so today. Hon^Ncck •Jofy 3: 6th annual Houghs Nedc Family ; Fun Day, 9 a.m.

In addition, Mader said, the h(»pital has a lot of medical assets today it did ncrt have in the early '90s, including the state's first [^ychiatric-geriatric unit, a surgical affiliation with Boston's Brigham and Wmnen's Hospital, a car- Fo Uowing is a list of Quincy oiganizatk Mis holding Fourdi (rf July events Friday and Sat- urday: Baker Bead Aisocialioa •Jnly 4: Field Day, 9 a.m. - 9 p.m., Edgewater ; Games, rac», t^ettwll games, giant i walk, dunk tank a»i road races for kids. •Jiriy 3: l U^ race, mini-bicyde parade and Miss Menyn Mwm contest, children's en- tertainment and due jodwy, p.m., Mer- lymount B«k A, Sboit Ave.

Taeaday to p Uns to sign die frtii J BBP"* to make it official as iomi as it reaches his deakneitwed L Tte Uw initially was ooooems. •Inly 4: Chikfaen's noes and field day at 9 a.m^ parade at 1 p JB., Me Rymount Beach. VNN 2 CNie Amdiriio B •Jaly 3: Disc jockey, 7 to 9 pjn., Fbre River Fie M at Iterison Are.

Prior to dtt (Hdinance'^ final approval Monday oigltf, Mc Grath said he re- viewed die law w Mi Assis- tant City Solicitor Kevm rao KB lalareaci Dded that hp«tt M«tf &me KW*er po^OB SO it coo W vote White, and OBflwonli Macewidi •dmnummtv^ hteder, to WHAT J OPEN WHAT'S CLOSED ONTHi4TH Retail stores, aipemyukets opo L Liquor stores op^ l^vems, bars aptm. Sqnatai ff Bwtk af My Cen Ottcc •Jaly 4: n^-ndsiig. •My4:autt»'8r Boes,t Mcycle anddo U cniat B puade, bufaecue hack, 10 aji.. J '%'■ Jhifltl 'Tth»* Si Mz Mt SL^i^idiiil S^ # .■- •« * .f?

Ayers told the board that after the license board last meeting three weeks ago, M & G was told to meet with the building department. He said since the owner has not responded to certified letters or telephone calls he was "losing faith" over what he could do.

Maralin Manning, executive director of the Quincy Center business and Professional Associaiton said the company has been soliciting in Quincy after they had told the board that they sell their products out of Quincy.

^£ Hearing Continued On Imports Firm Complaints NISON WONG, third ftrom right, a fifth grader at the Parlur School, recently won Clifford's Flowers fourth annual ''Hat's Of T contest Some 375 entries fhni fourth and fifth graders wer« submitted.

Children write an essay that describes the woman he or she most admire. From left, Shaue-Fung Peng, guidance counselor; Xiang Wang, father; Jim Clifford, owner, Wendy, Nison, Susan Dillon, fifth grade teacher; and Barbara Varao, Clifford's marketing director.

It is hoped the 50,000-8quare-foot addidcm funding 7-1 Monday night, wi Uopai m 2000 City Auditor Robert Foy found the additional funding for the project in the fol- lowing places: proceeds from the Stq) &. (tf Newton, will do site testing and other prepa- ration before beginning more involved work in the late summer, Mc Laughlin said.

"There are lot of good things happening at die 1ks- pital," she said. While there have been losses, business has been excellent." Mader also noted that the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) gave the hospital a grade of 96 out of a possi- ble 100 following a recent inspection. Medicare paid (Cont'd on page 8) 0,000; state Lottery money, 5,228; Quincy mer Mayor"and'^m City Community Access Televi- Councillw Francis Mc Cau- sion, 5,000; and the ley-was about 18 months North Quincy Drainage Project, ,072.01.

Quincy Hospital's finan- cial woes, she said, are i Mgely die result of changes in the healthcare industry that are beyond its contnri. The Quincy Conununity Access funding came from Media One, the city's cable television provider, while i^irding to Ubrary Direc- heal Ay economy t^t drove the rest is s«! Con- up the cost of buihhng ma- The city already had an sfruction already has been t«"ff • „u .^ j ,r, .j o\ delayed for two mon Uis be- Mayor James Sheets and (Cont'd on page 8) New Signage Ordinance Gets Final Council OK A new citywide signage last-minute ordinance recently passed included, by the City Council has re- Aldiough die matter was ceived its final approval.

Shop Ga- rage,

It is hoped the 50,000-8quare-foot addidcm funding 7-1 Monday night, wi Uopai m 2000 City Auditor Robert Foy found the additional funding for the project in the fol- lowing places: proceeds from the Stq) &. (tf Newton, will do site testing and other prepa- ration before beginning more involved work in the late summer, Mc Laughlin said.

"There are lot of good things happening at die 1ks- pital," she said. While there have been losses, business has been excellent." Mader also noted that the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) gave the hospital a grade of 96 out of a possi- ble 100 following a recent inspection. Medicare paid (Cont'd on page 8) $550,000; state Lottery money, $365,228; Quincy mer Mayor"and'^m City Community Access Televi- Councillw Francis Mc Cau- sion, $375,000; and the ley-was about 18 months North Quincy Drainage Project, $38,072.01.

Quincy Hospital's finan- cial woes, she said, are i Mgely die result of changes in the healthcare industry that are beyond its contnri. The Quincy Conununity Access funding came from Media One, the city's cable television provider, while i^irding to Ubrary Direc- heal Ay economy t^t drove the rest is s«! Con- up the cost of buihhng ma- The city already had an sfruction already has been t«"ff • „u .^ j ,r, .j o\ delayed for two mon Uis be- Mayor James Sheets and (Cont'd on page 8) New Signage Ordinance Gets Final Council OK A new citywide signage last-minute ordinance recently passed included, by the City Council has re- Aldiough die matter was ceived its final approval.

Shop Ga- rage, $1 million; JFK Health Center bond, $745,083.86; Marshall School bond. Ward 3 Councillor Patrick Mc E)er- mott is recovering from sur- gery and did not attend the meeting. The additional funding was needed because of a Bemice Mader, adminis- trative assistant to Mayor James Sheets and a memt)er of the Mayor's Task Force on Partnership at Quincy Hospital, said despite an approximately $5 million in losses at the hospital over the past two years-'- including $1 million in May alone—the hospital has far from hit bottom. "But things have been a lot worse at the hospital in the past" Mader recalled when dien-Quincy Hospital Chief Financial Officer Richard Jeffcoate visited Sheets in 1990, shortly after the mayor first took office, and ask^ if the hospital could borrow more than $1 mil- lion frmn the city because it only bad 10 days worth of (grating funds.

Hie council's support will allow the $15 million project as soon as this week. At the time, the hospital's Mc Cauley Building-named after for- BERNi CEMAi^R diac cathedzitficn Knit* a pediatric affiliation with Boston's Beth Israel Hos- pital, and more.

||

It is hoped the 50,000-8quare-foot addidcm funding 7-1 Monday night, wi Uopai m 2000 City Auditor Robert Foy found the additional funding for the project in the fol- lowing places: proceeds from the Stq) &. (tf Newton, will do site testing and other prepa- ration before beginning more involved work in the late summer, Mc Laughlin said."There are lot of good things happening at die 1ks- pital," she said. While there have been losses, business has been excellent." Mader also noted that the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) gave the hospital a grade of 96 out of a possi- ble 100 following a recent inspection. Medicare paid (Cont'd on page 8) $550,000; state Lottery money, $365,228; Quincy mer Mayor"and'^m City Community Access Televi- Councillw Francis Mc Cau- sion, $375,000; and the ley-was about 18 months North Quincy Drainage Project, $38,072.01.Quincy Hospital's finan- cial woes, she said, are i Mgely die result of changes in the healthcare industry that are beyond its contnri. The Quincy Conununity Access funding came from Media One, the city's cable television provider, while i^irding to Ubrary Direc- heal Ay economy t^t drove the rest is s«! Con- up the cost of buihhng ma- The city already had an sfruction already has been t«"ff • „u .^ j ,r, .j o\ delayed for two mon Uis be- Mayor James Sheets and (Cont'd on page 8) New Signage Ordinance Gets Final Council OK A new citywide signage last-minute ordinance recently passed included, by the City Council has re- Aldiough die matter was ceived its final approval.Shop Ga- rage, $1 million; JFK Health Center bond, $745,083.86; Marshall School bond. Ward 3 Councillor Patrick Mc E)er- mott is recovering from sur- gery and did not attend the meeting. The additional funding was needed because of a Bemice Mader, adminis- trative assistant to Mayor James Sheets and a memt)er of the Mayor's Task Force on Partnership at Quincy Hospital, said despite an approximately $5 million in losses at the hospital over the past two years-'- including $1 million in May alone—the hospital has far from hit bottom. "But things have been a lot worse at the hospital in the past" Mader recalled when dien-Quincy Hospital Chief Financial Officer Richard Jeffcoate visited Sheets in 1990, shortly after the mayor first took office, and ask^ if the hospital could borrow more than $1 mil- lion frmn the city because it only bad 10 days worth of (grating funds.Hie council's support will allow the $15 million project as soon as this week. At the time, the hospital's Mc Cauley Building-named after for- BERNi CEMAi^R diac cathedzitficn Knit* a pediatric affiliation with Boston's Beth Israel Hos- pital, and more.

million; JFK Health Center bond, 5,083.86; Marshall School bond. Ward 3 Councillor Patrick Mc E)er- mott is recovering from sur- gery and did not attend the meeting. The additional funding was needed because of a Bemice Mader, adminis- trative assistant to Mayor James Sheets and a memt)er of the Mayor's Task Force on Partnership at Quincy Hospital, said despite an approximately million in losses at the hospital over the past two years-'- including

It is hoped the 50,000-8quare-foot addidcm funding 7-1 Monday night, wi Uopai m 2000 City Auditor Robert Foy found the additional funding for the project in the fol- lowing places: proceeds from the Stq) &. (tf Newton, will do site testing and other prepa- ration before beginning more involved work in the late summer, Mc Laughlin said.

"There are lot of good things happening at die 1ks- pital," she said. While there have been losses, business has been excellent." Mader also noted that the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) gave the hospital a grade of 96 out of a possi- ble 100 following a recent inspection. Medicare paid (Cont'd on page 8) $550,000; state Lottery money, $365,228; Quincy mer Mayor"and'^m City Community Access Televi- Councillw Francis Mc Cau- sion, $375,000; and the ley-was about 18 months North Quincy Drainage Project, $38,072.01.

Quincy Hospital's finan- cial woes, she said, are i Mgely die result of changes in the healthcare industry that are beyond its contnri. The Quincy Conununity Access funding came from Media One, the city's cable television provider, while i^irding to Ubrary Direc- heal Ay economy t^t drove the rest is s«! Con- up the cost of buihhng ma- The city already had an sfruction already has been t«"ff • „u .^ j ,r, .j o\ delayed for two mon Uis be- Mayor James Sheets and (Cont'd on page 8) New Signage Ordinance Gets Final Council OK A new citywide signage last-minute ordinance recently passed included, by the City Council has re- Aldiough die matter was ceived its final approval.

Shop Ga- rage, $1 million; JFK Health Center bond, $745,083.86; Marshall School bond. Ward 3 Councillor Patrick Mc E)er- mott is recovering from sur- gery and did not attend the meeting. The additional funding was needed because of a Bemice Mader, adminis- trative assistant to Mayor James Sheets and a memt)er of the Mayor's Task Force on Partnership at Quincy Hospital, said despite an approximately $5 million in losses at the hospital over the past two years-'- including $1 million in May alone—the hospital has far from hit bottom. "But things have been a lot worse at the hospital in the past" Mader recalled when dien-Quincy Hospital Chief Financial Officer Richard Jeffcoate visited Sheets in 1990, shortly after the mayor first took office, and ask^ if the hospital could borrow more than $1 mil- lion frmn the city because it only bad 10 days worth of (grating funds.

Hie council's support will allow the $15 million project as soon as this week. At the time, the hospital's Mc Cauley Building-named after for- BERNi CEMAi^R diac cathedzitficn Knit* a pediatric affiliation with Boston's Beth Israel Hos- pital, and more.

||

It is hoped the 50,000-8quare-foot addidcm funding 7-1 Monday night, wi Uopai m 2000 City Auditor Robert Foy found the additional funding for the project in the fol- lowing places: proceeds from the Stq) &. (tf Newton, will do site testing and other prepa- ration before beginning more involved work in the late summer, Mc Laughlin said."There are lot of good things happening at die 1ks- pital," she said. While there have been losses, business has been excellent." Mader also noted that the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) gave the hospital a grade of 96 out of a possi- ble 100 following a recent inspection. Medicare paid (Cont'd on page 8) $550,000; state Lottery money, $365,228; Quincy mer Mayor"and'^m City Community Access Televi- Councillw Francis Mc Cau- sion, $375,000; and the ley-was about 18 months North Quincy Drainage Project, $38,072.01.Quincy Hospital's finan- cial woes, she said, are i Mgely die result of changes in the healthcare industry that are beyond its contnri. The Quincy Conununity Access funding came from Media One, the city's cable television provider, while i^irding to Ubrary Direc- heal Ay economy t^t drove the rest is s«! Con- up the cost of buihhng ma- The city already had an sfruction already has been t«"ff • „u .^ j ,r, .j o\ delayed for two mon Uis be- Mayor James Sheets and (Cont'd on page 8) New Signage Ordinance Gets Final Council OK A new citywide signage last-minute ordinance recently passed included, by the City Council has re- Aldiough die matter was ceived its final approval.Shop Ga- rage, $1 million; JFK Health Center bond, $745,083.86; Marshall School bond. Ward 3 Councillor Patrick Mc E)er- mott is recovering from sur- gery and did not attend the meeting. The additional funding was needed because of a Bemice Mader, adminis- trative assistant to Mayor James Sheets and a memt)er of the Mayor's Task Force on Partnership at Quincy Hospital, said despite an approximately $5 million in losses at the hospital over the past two years-'- including $1 million in May alone—the hospital has far from hit bottom. "But things have been a lot worse at the hospital in the past" Mader recalled when dien-Quincy Hospital Chief Financial Officer Richard Jeffcoate visited Sheets in 1990, shortly after the mayor first took office, and ask^ if the hospital could borrow more than $1 mil- lion frmn the city because it only bad 10 days worth of (grating funds.Hie council's support will allow the $15 million project as soon as this week. At the time, the hospital's Mc Cauley Building-named after for- BERNi CEMAi^R diac cathedzitficn Knit* a pediatric affiliation with Boston's Beth Israel Hos- pital, and more.

million in May alone—the hospital has far from hit bottom. "But things have been a lot worse at the hospital in the past" Mader recalled when dien-Quincy Hospital Chief Financial Officer Richard Jeffcoate visited Sheets in 1990, shortly after the mayor first took office, and ask^ if the hospital could borrow more than

It is hoped the 50,000-8quare-foot addidcm funding 7-1 Monday night, wi Uopai m 2000 City Auditor Robert Foy found the additional funding for the project in the fol- lowing places: proceeds from the Stq) &. (tf Newton, will do site testing and other prepa- ration before beginning more involved work in the late summer, Mc Laughlin said.

"There are lot of good things happening at die 1ks- pital," she said. While there have been losses, business has been excellent." Mader also noted that the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) gave the hospital a grade of 96 out of a possi- ble 100 following a recent inspection. Medicare paid (Cont'd on page 8) $550,000; state Lottery money, $365,228; Quincy mer Mayor"and'^m City Community Access Televi- Councillw Francis Mc Cau- sion, $375,000; and the ley-was about 18 months North Quincy Drainage Project, $38,072.01.

Quincy Hospital's finan- cial woes, she said, are i Mgely die result of changes in the healthcare industry that are beyond its contnri. The Quincy Conununity Access funding came from Media One, the city's cable television provider, while i^irding to Ubrary Direc- heal Ay economy t^t drove the rest is s«! Con- up the cost of buihhng ma- The city already had an sfruction already has been t«"ff • „u .^ j ,r, .j o\ delayed for two mon Uis be- Mayor James Sheets and (Cont'd on page 8) New Signage Ordinance Gets Final Council OK A new citywide signage last-minute ordinance recently passed included, by the City Council has re- Aldiough die matter was ceived its final approval.

Shop Ga- rage, $1 million; JFK Health Center bond, $745,083.86; Marshall School bond. Ward 3 Councillor Patrick Mc E)er- mott is recovering from sur- gery and did not attend the meeting. The additional funding was needed because of a Bemice Mader, adminis- trative assistant to Mayor James Sheets and a memt)er of the Mayor's Task Force on Partnership at Quincy Hospital, said despite an approximately $5 million in losses at the hospital over the past two years-'- including $1 million in May alone—the hospital has far from hit bottom. "But things have been a lot worse at the hospital in the past" Mader recalled when dien-Quincy Hospital Chief Financial Officer Richard Jeffcoate visited Sheets in 1990, shortly after the mayor first took office, and ask^ if the hospital could borrow more than $1 mil- lion frmn the city because it only bad 10 days worth of (grating funds.

Hie council's support will allow the $15 million project as soon as this week. At the time, the hospital's Mc Cauley Building-named after for- BERNi CEMAi^R diac cathedzitficn Knit* a pediatric affiliation with Boston's Beth Israel Hos- pital, and more.

||

It is hoped the 50,000-8quare-foot addidcm funding 7-1 Monday night, wi Uopai m 2000 City Auditor Robert Foy found the additional funding for the project in the fol- lowing places: proceeds from the Stq) &. (tf Newton, will do site testing and other prepa- ration before beginning more involved work in the late summer, Mc Laughlin said."There are lot of good things happening at die 1ks- pital," she said. While there have been losses, business has been excellent." Mader also noted that the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) gave the hospital a grade of 96 out of a possi- ble 100 following a recent inspection. Medicare paid (Cont'd on page 8) $550,000; state Lottery money, $365,228; Quincy mer Mayor"and'^m City Community Access Televi- Councillw Francis Mc Cau- sion, $375,000; and the ley-was about 18 months North Quincy Drainage Project, $38,072.01.Quincy Hospital's finan- cial woes, she said, are i Mgely die result of changes in the healthcare industry that are beyond its contnri. The Quincy Conununity Access funding came from Media One, the city's cable television provider, while i^irding to Ubrary Direc- heal Ay economy t^t drove the rest is s«! Con- up the cost of buihhng ma- The city already had an sfruction already has been t«"ff • „u .^ j ,r, .j o\ delayed for two mon Uis be- Mayor James Sheets and (Cont'd on page 8) New Signage Ordinance Gets Final Council OK A new citywide signage last-minute ordinance recently passed included, by the City Council has re- Aldiough die matter was ceived its final approval.Shop Ga- rage, $1 million; JFK Health Center bond, $745,083.86; Marshall School bond. Ward 3 Councillor Patrick Mc E)er- mott is recovering from sur- gery and did not attend the meeting. The additional funding was needed because of a Bemice Mader, adminis- trative assistant to Mayor James Sheets and a memt)er of the Mayor's Task Force on Partnership at Quincy Hospital, said despite an approximately $5 million in losses at the hospital over the past two years-'- including $1 million in May alone—the hospital has far from hit bottom. "But things have been a lot worse at the hospital in the past" Mader recalled when dien-Quincy Hospital Chief Financial Officer Richard Jeffcoate visited Sheets in 1990, shortly after the mayor first took office, and ask^ if the hospital could borrow more than $1 mil- lion frmn the city because it only bad 10 days worth of (grating funds.Hie council's support will allow the $15 million project as soon as this week. At the time, the hospital's Mc Cauley Building-named after for- BERNi CEMAi^R diac cathedzitficn Knit* a pediatric affiliation with Boston's Beth Israel Hos- pital, and more.

mil- lion frmn the city because it only bad 10 days worth of (grating funds.

Hie council's support will allow the million project as soon as this week. At the time, the hospital's Mc Cauley Building-named after for- BERNi CEMAi^R diac cathedzitficn Knit* a pediatric affiliation with Boston's Beth Israel Hos- pital, and more.

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